The 8 Best Hand Sanitizers That Are Still In Stock

I was lucky enough to go on a cruise, recently, and I was astounded by the number of hand sanitizers placed around the ship as well as the crew's persistence in trying to persuade me to use the stuff. The best way to prevent the spread of infections and decrease the risk of getting sick is by washing your hands with plain soap and water, advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is essential, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing, or blowing one's nose.
Another important point that must be emphasized is that in order to get the benefit of the sanitizer, the individual must use the same discretion as he or Hand Dispensers she would when washing - that is, the sanitizer must be thoroughly rubbed into all surfaces of the hand and let dry to achieve maximum effectiveness.

Antibacterial hand sanitizer use may cause skin sensitivity in the form of itching, burning sensation or dry skin 1 2 Most forms of the sanitizer contain alcohol, which can easily cause redness, dryness and even peeling of skin, especially if used too often.
According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) , there has been a sharp increase in hand sanitizer products that are labeled to contain the commonly used ethanol (also known as ethyl alcohol) but have tested positive for methanol contamination.

To help kill microbes that can make you sick, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend washing your hands with soap and water several times a day, spending at least 20 seconds lathering your hands, including the back of your hands as well as underneath your fingernails.
In response to COVID-19, the FDA reminds people to wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds (especially after going to the bathroom, before eating and after coughing, sneezing or blowing one's nose) to prevent the spread of the coronavirus If soap and water is not available, the CDC suggests using a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent ethanol to kill most disease-causing germs.
Some hand sanitizer products use agents other than alcohol to kill microorganisms, such as povidone-iodine , benzalkonium chloride or triclosan 4 The World Health Organization (WHO) and the CDC recommends "persistent" antiseptics for hand sanitizers.

Washing with water alone will reduce bacteria to 23 percent, according to a January 2011 study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health But using soap will reduce the total bacteria to about 8 percent, researchers found.
The efficacy experiments reported here reinforce what has been known for >50 years: 40% ethanol is a less effective bacterial antiseptic than 60% ethanol ( 6 ). Consumers should be alerted to check the alcohol concentration in hand sanitizers because substandard products may be marketed to the public.

But even before the agency started warning about methanol in sanitizers and announcing recalls of products sold nationwide at retailers including Walmart and Target , the FDA identified another potential danger is some new products flooding the market.
Many studies have found that sanitizers with an alcohol concentration between 60-95% are more effective at killing germs than those with a lower alcohol concentration or non-alcohol-based hand sanitizers 16 , 20 Hand sanitizers without 60-95% alcohol 1) may not work equally well for many types of germs; and 2) merely reduce the growth of germs rather than kill them outright.

You need to wash your hands the proper way and often. The CDC's recommendation to use hand sanitizer with at least 60% ethanol is wrong with reference to Coronavirus, and its guidelines need updating. In an age when viruses seem to abound, frequent hand washing and the use of effective sanitizers is a must.

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